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Houseplants are a great way to bring the delights of the natural world into our homes, helping to purify the air and give us a sense of well-being. However, many commonly grown houseplants are highly toxic to cats if touched or eaten, leading to serious illness or even death.

To help you keep your feline friends safe from harm, we’ve put together a comprehensive A-Z list of houseplants that are toxic to cats. If you grow any of these beautiful plants in your home, make sure they are placed well out of the way of any inquisitive pets! Should your cat come into contact with or nibble at any of these plants, make sure to contact your veterinary clinic for advice right away.

(Disclaimer – we’ve tried to identify every common houseplant that is toxic to cats, but if bringing a new plant into your home it is always best to double-check it is safe for animals first! The ASPCA also produces a useful list of plants that are not toxic to cats if you’re looking to purchase some new houseplants).

1. Aloe Vera (Aloe Barbadensis Miller)

Aloe Vera Plant
Image Credit: Nevada31 / Adobe Stock

The fleshy, gel-like leaves of aloe vera contain saponins and anthraquinones, both of which are toxic to cats if ingested.

2. Amaryllis (Amaryllis spp.)

Amaryllis flowers.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

All parts of the amaryllis plant, particularly the bulb, contain a substance called lycorine that is toxic to cats if eaten.

3. Asparagus Fern (Asparagus Densiflorus)

Asparagus densiflorus, asparagus fern, plume asparagus or foxtail fern green stems close-up, horizontal outdoors summer tropical floral and botanical stock photo image photography wallpaper.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Asparagus fern – which is not a true fern – contains sapinogens, a toxic substance that causes severe gastrointestinal issues in cats.

Related: 12 Beautiful Fern Varieties to Grow in Your Garden This Year

4. Azalea (Rhododendron spp.)

Azaleas
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

All parts of the azalea plant contain grayanotoxins, which can cause severe illness in cats if ingested.

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5. Begonia (Begonia spp.)

Red colored begonias (Begonia tuberhybrida) in garden
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Indoor begonias contain insoluble oxalates that cause irritation and swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips if eaten.

6. Bird of Paradise (Strelitzia Reginae)

Colorful, exotic Strelitzia flower
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

While its toxicity is generally mild compared to other plants on this list, bird of paradise plants can cause mild gastrointestinal upset if your cat nibbles at the foliage or flowers.

7. Caladium (Caladium spp.)

Colorful Leaves of Caladium Plants as Natural Texture Background.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

If ingested, all parts of the caladium plant are toxic to cats and can cause severe irritation and swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips.

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8. Chrysanthemum (Chrysanthemum spp.)

Red chrysanthemum in the graden.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Chrysanthemums contain pyrethrins, which can cause mild toxicity in cats if ingested. Symptoms may include drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, and mild dermatitis.

9. Clivia Lily (Clivia Miniate)

Clivia miniata, Natal lily, bush lily, Kaffir lily in bloom.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Clivia lilies contain lycorine, which can cause symptoms such as salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, and trembling.

10. Corn Plant (Dracaena Fragrans)

Cornstalk dracaena fragrans plant.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Corn plants can cause symptoms such as vomiting, drooling, and lack of appetite if ingested by cats.

11. Dumbcane (Dieffenbachia Seguine)

Dumbcane plants, Dieffenbachia seguine, in a rainforest in Southeast Asia.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

All parts of the dumbcane plant are toxic to cats if ingested, causing intense burning and irritation of the mouth, tongue, and lips.

12. Elephant Ear (Alocasia spp)

Leaves of the Elephant Ear Colocasia Taro plant.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Elephant ear plants contain a toxic substance that, if ingested by cats, leads to symptoms including excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.

13. English Ivy (Hedera Helix)

A closeup shot of dark green leaves of Common Ivy or Hedera helix in the forest.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

All parts of the English ivy plant, including the leaves and berries, are toxic to cats if ingested and can be potentially fatal.

14. Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus Cinerea)

Selective focus of green decorative eucalyptus branches isolated on white.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Eucalyptus leaves can cause symptoms such as excessive drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, depression, and weakness if eaten by cats.

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15. Geranium (Pelargonium spp.)

Geranium in pots.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

While geraniums are not highly toxic to cats, they can cause symptoms such as vomiting, appetite loss, depression, and skin irritation.

16. Gladiolus (Gladiolus spp.)

Gorgeous garden view with red gladiolus flowers.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Gladiolus contains glycosides that, if eaten by cats, can cause symptoms such as salivation, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, tremors, or even collapse.

17. Hibiscus (Hibiscus spp.)

Orange hibiscus flower blooming in the garden. This is also called Chinese hibiscus, China rose, Hawaiian hibiscus, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis. In Bengali or Bangla Joba ful. Floral background.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Hibiscus is not highly toxic to cats but can cause mild gastrointestinal upset if ingested. 

18. Jade Plant (Crassula Ovata)

Crassula ovata, commonly known as jade plant, lucky plant, money plant or money tree.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Jade plants contain compounds that can cause vomiting, depression, lack of coordination, and heart problems in cats.

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19. Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe Blossfeldiana)

Potted colorful succulent Kalanchoe blossfeldiana flowers.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

All parts of the kalanchoe plant are toxic to cats if ingested and can cause symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, and in severe cases, heart rhythm abnormalities.

20. Lantana (Lantana Camara)

Beautiful lantana flowers.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

If a cat consumes any part of a lantana plant, symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, and depression.

21. Lily (Lilium spp.)

Close up of a single orange day lily, Hemerocallis fulva, in full bloom.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

All parts of the lily plant, including the petals, leaves, pollen, and even water from the vase, are highly toxic to cats if ingested and can cause acute kidney failure if treatment is not sought immediately.

22. Mother-in-Law’s Tongue (Sansevieria Trifasciata)

Sansevieria trifasciata or Snake plant in pot at home.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Mother-in-law’s tongue, also known as snake plant or Sansevieria, can cause nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea in cats if eaten.

23. Oleander (Nerium Oleander)

Beautiful pink flowers of the plant Oleander (Nerium oleander). Lush flowering of decorative flowers in the summer garden in sunny weather.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Oleander contains cardiac glycosides, which can affect the heart and cause severe symptoms such as vomiting, drooling, abdominal pain, diarrhea, decreased heart rate, and potentially death.

24. Peace Lily (Spathiphyllum)

Spathiphyllum cochlearispathum is a plant species of the genus Spathiphyllum in the family Araceae. It is native to southern Mexico and often cultivated as a houseplant, is commonly called Peace Lily.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

If eaten by cats, peace lilies can cause symptoms such as oral irritation, burning sensation, excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.

25. Peony (Paoenia spp.)

Close up of pink peony flowers in garden.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Peonies are not highly toxic to cats but can cause mild stomach issues if eaten.

26. Philodendron (Philodendron spp.)

A closeup of a fresh philodendron plant with green growing leaves.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Philodendrons can cause intense irritation and swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips if eaten by cats.

27. Pothos (Epipremnum Aureum)

Epipremnum aureum is a plant found in tropical forests around the world. Stems are ivy with aerial roots. heart shaped leaves green pointed leaf tips.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

If ingested by cats, pothos plants cause symptoms including excessive drooling, vomiting, and difficulty swallowing.

28. Rubber Plant (Ficus Elastica)

Ficus elastica (Also known as the rubber fig, rubber bush, rubber tree) in nature. The latex of Ficus elastica is an irritant to the eyes and skin and is toxic if taken internally.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

All parts of the rubber plant are toxic to cats if ingested and will cause oral and gastrointestinal irritation.

29. Sago Palm (Cycas Revoluta)

Sago palm (Cycas revoluta) in a park of Barcelona city, Spain.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Sago palms contain cycasin, a toxic compound that can cause severe gastrointestinal symptoms, liver failure, and seizures in cats.

30. Swiss Cheese Plant (Monstera Deliciosa)

Monstera deliciosa, the Swiss cheese plant, is a species of flowering plant native to tropical forests of southern Mexico, south to Panama. ornamental plants on the porch of the house
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

If eaten by cats, all parts of the Swiss cheese plant can cause symptoms such as oral irritation, excessive drooling, and vomiting.

31. Tulip (Tulipa spp.)

Close-up of orange tulip with yellow and red tulips background.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Tulips contain a toxic substance called tulipalin which, if ingested by cats, can cause digestive issues.

32. Umbrella Plant (Schefflera)

A top view of the Schefflera plant growing in the garden.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

All parts of the umbrella plant are toxic to cats if ingested and will cause intense irritation and swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips.

33. Yucca (Yucca spp.)

Yucca. Yucca flowers. leaves and flowers of Yucca. Manioc. Manihot esculenta.
Image Credit: Deposit Photos

Severe yucca toxicity is rare but, if eaten by cats, can symptoms such as vomiting, diarrhea, and incoordination.

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cinnamon on houseplant
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coffee grounds
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climbing red roses
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